Hiding in plain sight

I’ve always been the kind of person who looked at buildings – the fancy windows and old signs and roof decorations that you never see unless you look up.

Even so, I was surprised recently to realise that although I must have looked at this a thousand times (several times a day for 250 days a year for four years, anyway!), I’d never realised that the hall and offices were perfect Georgian.

I think it might be partly because although it’s the old High Street of the village, there’s nothing else Georgian there – a medieval church and a 16th century house, but everything else is Victorian or later.

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It still surprises me, because I did always know that the Victorian parts of the school and the newer parts were different – as a child it was the mock baronial parts that fascinated me. I was convinced that it should have secret passages, and I remember that we read a book where an old building had stepped gables just the same.

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And then a few days later I took a slightly different route from usual to deliver an exam, as the usual shortcut was blocked by building works, and found myself walking past this late 18th century wellhead, tucked among far more recent buildings.

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Of course, having found one, I found another a day or two later, not far up the road.

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I think the moral of this story is that history is everywhere – or that you don’t need to go far to have adventures!

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